Catch Up With New Driving Laws Introduced In 2019

 

2019 has seen new laws introduced just like each and every other year in the United Kingdom.

New motoring laws have come into effect and more are on the way for when the UK leaves the European Union.

There has been some drastic changes for motorists this year so far. Here is everything you need to know about the driving laws introduced in 2019 so far:

Low Emission Rules
In April London’s new Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) came into effect, in a bid to reduce harmful emissions and improve air quality in the capital.

If a vehicle doesn’t meet ULEZ emission standards, the driver will have to pay a charge to drive in the area.

Drivers of cars, motorcycles and vans will have to pay £12.50 while heavier vehicles like lorries will be subject to a £100 fee.

Parking
A pavement parking ban has been in place in London since 1974, however there could be new legislation introduced that would see restrictions extended across England.

A blanket of pavement parking ban is unlikely to come into effect any time soon as it’s implementation is unpopular.

Car Tax
In April, Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) car tax went up increased by £5 in line with inflation and for most drivers this meant their annual .

High emission cars will be charged up to an additional £15, diesel car will continue to pay higher tax rates and new car buyers could face an extra £65 on first-year car tax.

New Drivers
Learner drivers will be allowed on the motorway and new drivers who have been driving for less than two years face stiffer penalties for offences like speeding.

Smart Motorways
Hard shoulders are being converted into running lanes on motorways in order to grow the number of refuge areas to reduce the risk for those who may suffer a breakdown or crash.

Highways England plans to build more emergency refuge areas across the smart motorway network.

Intelligent Speed Assist
From 2022 new cars will be fitted with Intelligent Speed Assist under the EU’s revised General Safety Regulation. The goal is to increase road safety and minimise collisions.

Other safety systems include warnings for driver distraction and drowsiness, cameras/sensors for reversing, advanced emergency braking, lane keeping assistance and a ‘black box’ data recorder for incident reporting.

Overtaking cyclists
Drivers will be instructed to give way to cyclists and pedestrians when turning left to provide some clarity to the current Highway Code.

The United Kingdom will be in line with other countries , where cyclists and pedestrians always have priority.

Driving Abroad
When the UK leaves the European Union, many of us may require new licences when driving in the EU.

It will cost £5.50 on an international permit if the UK leave Europe without a deal. This will be available to purchase from the Post Office.

A motor insurance green card when driving in the EU and EEA will be needed. Contact your insurance provider one month before you travel to obtain green cards for your vehicle, caravan or trailer.

Driving lessons on motorways
Earlier in 2019, it became possible for learner drivers to take lessons on the motorways.

In the past, new drivers could only use motorways once they had already passed their driving test. However, this is only optional – it isn’t compulsory for learners to have lessons on them.

There are new categories for defects with cars which drivers will have to understand, which are:

Dangerous – Direct risk to road safety or the environment. Results in a Fail.
Major – Could affect safety or the environment. Results in a Fail.
Minor – No effect on safety, but should be repaired as soon as possible.
Advisory – Could have an effect in future.
Pass – Meets the current legal standards.

A variety of new requirements are also being included in the MOT for the first time.

These checks include:

  • Under-inflated tyres
  • Contaminated brake fluid
  • Brake pad warning lights and missing brake pads or discs
  • Reversing lights (for vehicles newer than September 2009)
  • Daytime running lights (for vehicles newer than March 2018).

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